Hands-On Morakniv Garberg Review

morakniv garberg review

Morakniv has long been a go-to brand when it comes to outdoor knives. They tend to be cheap, durable and reliable.

Today, we’re going to be taking a look at one of Morakniv’s more expensive and higher end knives, the Garberg.

Throughout our Morakniv Garberg review, we’re going to take a look at what makes this knife special, and why it’s so much more expensive than most of the other knives Mora offers.

Let’s get to it.

Morakniv Garberg Specifications

 
  • Blade Material:  Sandvik 14C28N Stainless Steel
  • Blade Thickness: 0.12 inches (3.2mm)
  • Flex Grade: Stiff
  • Blade Length: 4.3inches (109mm)
  • Total Length: 9.8 inches (248mm)
  • Weight: 0.6lb (272g)
  • Handle Material: Polyamide
  • Grind: Scandi

Morakniv Garberg Review

We’ll begin our review by taking a look at the Garbergs specifications, then dig in to the nitty-gritty details.
morakniv garberg review

Handle

Let’s start our review of the Garberg by taking a look at its handle, which has both some good and bad points to discuss.

Starting off with the good. As you can see from the image, thanks to the blade’s full tang design, a small edge of the blade pokes out of the pommel. This 90-degree edge is a great addition as it allows you to strike a ferro rod using that part of the knife, as well as the spine of the blade.

I’ve also found that this can be used as a hammer or a mallet, particularly useful for crushing food like nuts when out in the field.

I’m not 100% sure on what material is used to make the handle, but it has a slightly soft rubber feel to it. I find that this has great heat retention, and feels warm in my hand, as opposed to some of the harder knives that I own.

As you can probably see from the images, the handle has a 2 panelled design. The inner panel features a rhombus pattern texture. This textured panel helps to create a bit of extra traction between your hand and the panel, allowing for a better grip. This is particularly useful when you’ve got wet or dirty hands.

Another nice addition to the handle is the lanyard hole, although I’m not a huge fan of adding a lanyard to my knife. That said, it’s always nice to have the option, especially if you’re a lanyard fan.

The handle itself is also fairly symmetrical in its design, which allows both left and righted people to use the same knife. It also opens up different ways to grip the knife when you’re using it for carving, which is particularly useful.

One aspect of the handle that I’m not such as fan of is the finger choil and protection, with there being virtually no barrier between your hand and the blade itself. Just be aware of this if you like to choke up on the knife with your carving.

Blade Material

Moving on to arguably the most important aspect of any knife, the blade material. Morakniv has used a SANDVIK 14C28N stainless steel for their Garberg.

To briefly summarise this steel; it’s a high-end knife steel that offers great edge retention, is corrosion resistant and is extremely, extremely tough. Does the knife itself live up to these expectations?

It certainly does. It’s really surprising just how solid this blade is. After a few point pressure tests, the blade stayed in perfect shape, no edge denting and no misshaping of the blade. You can definitely use the Garberg for batoning, and I would go as far as to say this is probably the best Mora knife for that. 

Blade Design

Grind

As with a lot (maybe even all?) of Mora’s knives, the Garberg makes use of a Scandi grind. This is great for intricate tasks such as feather sticking or other similar woodwork.

It’s also worth mentioning that the blade itself comes incredibly sharp out of the box, maybe even to the point of too sharp. I found it slightly difficult to feather a log at first as the blade would easily sink too far into the wood.

Scandi grinds are also incredibly easy to sharpen out in the field, providing you have a sharpening stone with you. That said, you probably won’t need to sharpen it for a while, but it’s always worth mentioning.

Where the Scandi grind somewhat lets the Garberg down is in the food department. It’s not ideal at slicing food or just meal prep in general. If you’d prefer a knife capable of both woodwork and food prep, it’s probably worth checking out our Morakniv Kansbol review, as this definitely fits the bill.

Spine

Similar to the Mora Kansbol we reviewed, the Garberg features a 3.2mm (0.1inch) 90-degree spine. This 90-degree spine makes the knife great for striking a fire starter, producing a ton of sparks. When I say “a ton of sparks”, I mean this is easily one of the best knives I’ve encountered for fire starting.

Full Tang

Unlike a lot of the other cheaper knives from Mora (Bushcraft Black, Companion, Kansbol), the Garberg features a full tang design. This essentially means that the blade continues to run through the entirety of the handle, and in the case of the Garberg, slightly protrudes from the pummel.

You really can’t go wrong with a full tang knife. They’re insanely strong and durable, which allows the knife to take a fair amount more punishment than other knives that are not full tang. As I’ve mentioned throughout the review, this is definitely the case with the Garberg, this thing is incredibly strong.

For me, the downside to Garbergs full tang design is the weight. It’s noticeably heavier than some of the other Moras I own. That said, it’s really down to personal preference as to whether or not the additional strength of the blade is worth the additional weight.

Length & Thickness

The blade measures 4.3 inches in length, which is great for your everyday bushcraft requirements. I’d say it’s not long enough to be an all-purpose survival knife, however, that’s not really what it’s meant for.

For me, the 4.3 inches is enough for what I need it to do. Plus, wearing a long knife on my belt can be a bit annoying, especially if I’m kneeling a fair amount.

The extra thick design of the blade (0.12 inches) makes it ideal for batoning wood, which is always handy when you need to get a fire going.

Sheath

When it comes to buying the Morakniv Garberg, you’ll have a few different options. I opted for the heavy-duty leather sheath, but there’s also a molle-mount sheath option as well. I prefer to wear my knives attached to my belt, so the leather option seemed the best for me. Plus, it was a bit cheaper that way as well.

The sheath itself feels amazing quality. It’s nice and thick (3mm) and the belt attachment loop has a bit of give to it. This is great if you’re kneeling down, as the knife won’t get caught on the floor and make things uncomfortable.

One downside I’ve found to the leather sheath is that there’s no drainage hole at the bottom. This can be a bit annoying if your blade is wet or dirty, as muck can start to gather at the bottom. I guess you could always cut your own hole if you really wanted to.

In all honesty, I prefer the plastic sheath design of the Kansbol, as you can remove the knife from your belt still sheathed, whereas this isn’t really possible with the Garbergs leather sheath.

Price

So, is the Garberg worth the higher price tag than we’re used to seeing from Mora?

Definitely! This is easily the most durable Mora that I own. Although it’s slightly heavier than what I’m used to, the peace of mind it offers is well and truly worth it.

Morakniv Garberg Pros & Cons

PROS

CONS

morakniv garberg review

Morakniv Garberg Review: The Verdict

A jack of all trades kind of knife. If you like to keep things minimal and only have one knife with you, this is a great option. It doesn’t particularly excel in any area, however it’s a great all-round, everyday carry companion knife.

If you’re a Mora fan, you won’t be disappointed by the Garberg.

Click here if you’d like to check the current price of the Mora Garberg.

Any Alternatives?

Below are a couple of other options from Morakniv, both of which are cheaper. I personally have both knives, with the Kansbol being my favorite Mora in my collection.

We’ve also got a full list of the best Morakniv knives that you can check out as well.

Morakniv Bushcraft Black

morakniv garberg review

If you’re looking for something slightly cheaper than Garberg, the Kansbol is a great option. The knife itself is subject to split opinions – some people love it; some people hate it.

I personally love it due to the grind and design of the blade. The bottom end of the blade features a classic Scandi grind, whilst the tip of the blade thins out to an almost full flat grind. This makes the knife incredibly versatile, especially when it comes to food prep.

  • Blade Material: 12C27 Stainless Steel
  • Blade Thickness: 0.1 inch (2.5 mm)
  • Flex Grade: Stiff
  • Blade Length: 4.3 inch (109 mm)
  • Total Length: 9.8 inch (250mm)
  • Weight: 0.3 lb (134g)
  • Handle Material: TPE-Rubber
  • Grind: Scandi

Morakniv Kansbol

If you’re looking for something slightly cheaper than Garberg, the Kansbol is a great option. The knife itself is subject to split opinions – some people love it; some people hate it.

I personally love it due to the grind and design of the blade. The bottom end of the blade features a classic Scandi grind, whilst the tip of the blade thins out to an almost full flat grind. This makes the knife incredibly versatile, especially when it comes to food prep.

  • Blade Material: 12C27 Stainless Steel
  • Blade Thickness: 0.1 inch (2.5 mm)
  • Flex Grade: Stiff
  • Blade Length: 4.3 inch (109 mm)
  • Total Length: 9.8 inch (250mm)
  • Weight: 0.3 lb (134g)
  • Handle Material: TPE-Rubber
  • Grind: Scandi

Final Thoughts

Well, I hope you’ve found our Morakniv Garberg review helpful.

If you have any questions or would like to add anything, please feel free to get in touch via the comment section below.

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