BEST VALUE

morakniv bushcraft knife
Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade

EDITORS CHOICE

gerber strong arm bushcraft knife
Gerber StrongArm

PREMIUM CHOICE

best bushcraft knife under $100
KA-BAR Becker Kephart
Quick Navigation
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest

Best Bushcraft Knives Under $100

Perhaps the most essential tool you can take into the backcountry is a knife! 

From hunting to cooking to miscellaneous tasks, a knife so often comes in handy that it quickly becomes indispensable. 

But when it comes to finding the best bushcraft knife under $100, you truly have an ocean of options to wade through. 

But don’t fret! We’ve evaluated many of the best options on the market, and compiled this list of our favorite bushcraft knives to get you started on the right path. So let’s dive in and take a look. 

Best Bushcraft Knives Under $100

Below, we’ve come up with our top 10 picks for the best bushcraft knives under $100. 

Our editor’s choice is the Gerber StrongArm Serrated Fixed Blade. With multiple attachment options and the weight needed behind the blade to get more than just your average small bushcraft task done, this is the all-in-one knife you need. 

Looking for something different? Try our budget pick of the Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade.  Lightweight and perfect for small carvings. 

Able to splurge a little bit price-wise? Try the classic KA-BAR Becker Kephart.  

No matter which knife you choose, we know you’ll love your new bushcraft knife. What are you waiting for? Read our reviews, find the perfect companion for you, then clic

Gerber StrongArm Serrated Fixed Blade 

gerber strong arm bushcraft knife
  • Materials:
    • Blade: Partially serrated steel blade
    • Handle: Glass-filled nylon with rubberized diamond-textured overmold
    • Sheath: Nylon webbing
  • Blade Tang: Full
  • Blade Length: 4.8 inches
  • Weight: 10.9 oz
  • Price: $

The Gerber StrongArm Serrated Fixed Blade Knife is the bush knife you need to get things done. With a partially serrated steel blade and striking pommel at the base of the knife the StrongArm is versatile and can take on a variety of tasks. Cutting small branches, cleaning fish or small game, or even cutting through string are no difficult tasks.

The almost 5-inch blade is short enough to carry around with ease but long enough to tackle any small or medium-sized bushcraft task. There are multiple sheath attachment options making this knife have several carry options, even if some of them are slightly complex.  

Unfortunately, the Gerber StrongArm is the heaviest knife on our list, but at only ⅔ of a pound, it is still easy to manage. The extra weight over some of its competitors actually makes the StrongArm able to stand up to tough tasks better and with more confidence.  

A textured rubber grip ensures the knife doesn’t fall out of even the sweatiest hands. Gerber also offers a lifetime limited warranty, so you can rest easy that you will get a replacement if your knife shows any manufacturing defects or serious issues over time.

PROS

CONS

Schrade SCHF30 Fixed Blade

best bushcraft knife under $100
  • Materials:
    • Blade: High Carbon Stainless Steel
    • Handle: Thermoplastic elastomer
    • Sheath: Thermoplastic
  • Blade Tang: Full
  • Blade Length: 4.9 inches
  • Weight: 6.3 oz
  • Price: $

With a similarly sized blade to the Gerber StrongArm, the Schrade SCHF30 Fixed Blade is another bush knife that can stand up to small and medium bushcraft alike. 

With a plastic handle (instead of rubber) this knife weighs only half the amount of the StrongArm, making it lighter and less of a burden to tote around. The plastic handle does make it slightly more difficult to use with sweaty hands, but when it also retails at half the price, it’s a small price to pay.

The Schrade SCHF30 does have a leg-up on the  Gerber StrongArm with its 90-degree squared-edge ground spine which can be used with a fire starter to ignite campfires quickly.  The knife also features multiple attachment and carry methods and has a lanyard hole for wrist attachment while in use. It locks inside of the sheath making sure it stays in place, even when you don’t.

The biggest downside of the Schrade SCHF30 Fixed Blade is the fact it dulls rather quickly after use. Fortunately, the blade is very easy to sharpen, meaning that with the right maintenance and care, this is a knife that will last you for years to come.

PROS

CONS

KA-BAR Becker BK2 Campanion Fixed Blade

best bushcraft knife under $100
  • Materials:
    • Blade: 1095 Cro-Van Steel
    • Handle: Ultramid Polyamide (Synthetic plastic)
    • Sheath: Hard shell nylon
  • Blade Tang: Full
  • Blade Length: 5.25 inches
  • Weight: 16 oz
  • Price: $$$

If you’re looking for a sleek knife, the all-black KA-BAR Becker BK2 Campanion Fixed Blade is the knife for you. Coming in with both the longest blade length and thickest blade on our list, this knife is not messing around. Designed with a full tang, this heavy-duty knife can easily withstand semi-intensive bushcraft and camping tasks.  

The plastic sheath has multiple attachment options, meaning you can carry this knife on your belt or pack and it will always be easily accessible. The knife locks into the sheath, ensuring it won’t slip out or get lost in the woods.  

While the handle is made of a plastic synthetic, it is shaped to have a more comfortable grip than other straight-handle knives. A lanyard hole means you can attach the knife to your wrist during tasks – and even if the knife slips out of your hand, you won’t lose it in the underbrush below. 

The KA-BAR Becker BK2 Campanion Fixed Blade is one of the pricier options on our list, but for the durability and extra blade length and thickness you get, we think it is well worth it.

PROS

CONS

Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade

  • Materials:
    • Blade: High Carbon Steel
    • Handle: Plastic & Rubber
    • Sheath: Plastic polymer
  • Blade Tang: Partial (3/4 handle length) 
  • Blade Length: 4.1 inches
  • Weight: 3.9 oz
  • Price: $

In search of a bargain? Look no further than the Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Knife. The most inexpensive option on our list, this knife is perfect for any hiker, camper, or hunter on a budget.

The Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Knife is a lightweight knife with a medium-length blade. Designed with only a partial tang, its thin blade won’t stand up to all bushcrafting tasks, but it is ideal for small jobs such as wood carving and fish cleaning. 

Available in multiple color options, this knife is great for beginners. It is easy to handle, easy to clean, and easy to sharpen. The sheath is designed for belt-carry only, but for most bushcrafters this is no issue. 

Morakniv supplies a limited lifetime warranty on all their knives so you can rest easy knowing defective knives will be replaced. While the tip of the blade of the Companion is known to dull or break when used improperly – which is not replaced under warranty – when used correctly, this knife is fantastic at tackling small tasks. Not to mention the price cannot be beat. 

PROS

CONS

Morakniv Bushcraft Knife

  • Materials:
    • Blade: Carbon Steel with Tungsten anti-corrosive coating
    • Handle: High-friction rubber
    • Sheath: Plastic polymer
  • Blade Tang: Partial (3/4 handle length) 
  • Blade Length: 4.3 inches
  • Weight: 5.7 oz
  • Price: $

Morakniv makes our list a second time with their Bushcraft Knife. With a Tungsten-coated Carbon steel blade, this knife is manufactured to be rust-resistant – an ideal quality when working in humid environments. The spine of the blade is unpolished, making fire starting a breeze.  

A friction rubber handle makes this Bushcraft Knife easy to keep a grip on, even during more intensive tasks. A partial tang means this knife is not as heavy-duty as some of the others on our list, but it is relatively inexpensive and a great budget option.  

Similarly to the Morakniv Companion, the Bushknife only has a belt attachment for its sheath. It does come with the same standard limited lifetime warranty Morkaniv offers on all of their knives.  

Overall, the Morakniv Bushknife is great for small and some medium bushcraft activities. It is slightly larger and sturdier than the Morakniv Companion, while also costing slightly more, but not breaking the bank.  The Morakniv Bushknife is perfect for those newer to bushcraft who want a good quality knife to start exploring.

PROS

CONS

Morakniv Garberg Full Tang

  • Materials:
    • Blade: Stainless Steel
    • Handle: Plastic 
    • Sheath: Plastic Polyamide or Leather 
  • Blade Tang: Full
  • Blade Length: 4.3 inches
  • Weight: 9.6 oz
  • Price: $$$

The Morakniv Garberg Full Tang is the third and final Morakniv knife in our top 10 picks for Best Bushcraft knife under $100. The priciest of the three Moraknivs, the Garberg is a full tang knife with a 4.3-inch stainless steel, corrosion-resistant straight blade. The spine is ground at a 90-degree (square-edge) angle, allowing it to be used with a firestarter for a quick flame.  

The Garberg has 2 different purchase options that include different sheaths. You can get the MOLLE compatible polyamide sheath which includes a belt loop, multi-mount base, three velcro straps, and a  secondary lock enabling you to carry multiple bush knives at once. The second option features a snap-close black leather sheath.

We don’t love the synthetic plastic handle, but it is textured to give you a better grip. There is also a lanyard hole near the base of the handle, allowing for wrist attachment. 

As with all Morakniv knives, the Garberg includes a limited lifetime warranty against manufacturing defects. 

The Garberg is one of the heavier options on our list at nearly 10 ounces. However this just gives it more strength to take on bigger bushcraft tasks than the other two Morakniv knives. 

If you’re on the market for a name-brand bushcraft knife you can trust, the Morakniv Garberg is a great full tang option.

PROS

CONS

Condor Tool & Knife Bushlore Camp Knife

  • Materials:
    • Blade: High Carbon Steel
    • Handle: Hardwood
    • Sheath: Leather
  • Blade Tang: Full
  • Blade Length: 4.25 inches
  • Weight: 7 oz
  • Price: $$ 

If a wooden handle is more of your style, the Condor Tool & Knife Bushlore Camp Knife is the bush knife for you. Made from quality materials, this knife has an average price point and is great for small and some medium bushcraft and camping tasks. 

Featuring a full tang high-carbon steel blade, this knife can dull quickly but is fairly easy to resharpen. A sturdy hardwood handle has a lanyard hole so you can attach the knife to you loosely while working.  

This Condor knife comes with a black leather sheath that supports a belt carry. Our biggest complaint is that the knife doesn’t lock into place in the sheath, but a fairly snug fit seems to keep it in place fairly well.  

The Condor Tool & Knife Bushlore Camp Knife is truly a good-looking knife that will get the small bushcraft jobs done with ease.

PROS

CONS

LionSTEEL M4

  • Materials:
    • Blade: Sintered (pressed instead of melted) Stainless Steel
    • Handle: Olive wood, Santos wood, Walnut wood, or black G10 (plastic impregnated with fiberglass)
    • Sheath: Leather
  • Blade Tang: Full
  • Blade Length: 3.74 inches
  • Weight: 6.35 oz
  • Price: $$

While retailing for over $100, if you are willing to splurge, the LionSTEEL M4 Knife is a fantastic knife that gives you a variety of options to choose from. 

Featuring 4 different handle materials, you can order the M4 in a style that best suits both your hands and your needs. The knife is available in Olive, Santos, or Walnut wood, or additionally in Black G10, which is a synthetic plastic impregnated with fiberglass.  

No matter which handle you choose, they all have a lanyard hole, allowing for easy wrist attachment while working. The handle is also ergonomically shaped so you can hold it with your thumb towards the blade or towards and aft end of the handle and have a comfortable grip either way.

The LionSTEEL M4 Knife comes with a double-seam leather sheath and high-quality pressed stainless steel blade. While the blade is shorter in length than most competitors, it is also one of the thickest, allowing it to penetrate thicker woods further.  

LionSTEEL offers a limited warranty against manufacturer defects, so you can buy it with confidence. 

PROS

CONS

KA-BAR Becker Kephart

best bushcraft knife under $100
  • Materials:
    • Blade: 1095 Cro-Van Steel
    • Handle: Walnut
    • Sheath: Leather
  • Blade Tang: Full
  • Blade Length: 5.125 inches
  • Weight: 6.4 oz
  • Price: $$$$

Less of a splurge than the LionSTEEL but still priced slightly over $100; if you are willing to break your budget by a few dollars, the KA-BAR Becker Kephart is a great knife for bushcraft.  

Featuring a long blade over 5 inches in length and one of the thickest blades on our list, the Becker Kephart is perfect for small and medium bushcraft tasks alike. Whether it’s trimming a small branch, making kindling, or skinning a small animal, the Becker Kephart is up for the task.  

Made from 1095 Cro-Van Steel, the blade is more corrosion resistant than some of its counterparts due to the added chromium and vanadium (Cro-Van). 

However, like all bush knives, it’s best to clean and oil your knife after (and even during!) every trip to keep it in prime condition. This knife is fairly easy to sharpen when it dulls and will last you for years if properly cared for. 

The KA-BAR Becker Kephart features a walnut handle which gives this knife a classic look and feel. It comes with a dark brown leather sheath that can attach to your belt loop. Unfortunately, the knife does not lock in the sheath, but it is a snug fit. As long as you aren’t doing any inverted rock climbing with this knife, you should be good to go!

PROS

CONS

Gerber – Bear Grylls Folding Sheath Knife

bear grylls survival knife
  • Materials:
    • Blade: Half Serrated High Carbon Stainless Steel
    • Handle: Textured Rubber
    • Sheath: Nylon
  • Blade Tang: N/A – Folding Knife
  • Blade Length: 3.58 inches
  • Weight: 5.3 oz
  • Price: $

If you are looking for a compact and portable bushcraft knife, Gerber’s Bear Grylls Folding Sheath Knife is the choice for you. Weighing just over 5 ounces with its nylon sheath, this knife is the second lightest on our list. Its folding capabilities give it the smallest carry dimensions as well. 

Its sheath can attach to your belt vertically or horizontally, and a velcro latch makes sure the knife stays securely in place. The sheath is also military-grade and mildew resistant so you can stay confident that it will hold up to the elements.

 The only folding knife on our list, the Bear Grylls Folding Sheath Knife does have the downside of not having a long tang. It also sports a very short blade length of only 3.6 inches. With this in mind, the Gerber Bear Grylls knife is ideal for light bushcraft but won’t hold up to heavy-duty tasks. 

The knife has a quality blade with a dual-sided thumb stud, making it great for right and left-handed people. It’s rubberized and textured grip is easy to hold on to, even if you’re prone to sweaty hands.  

While advertised as a “one-handed open”, it is very difficult to do single-handed. The blade locks when folded, a nice safety addition, but leads to trouble when trying to open with just one hand.

Overall, Gerber’s Bear Grylls Folding Sheath Knife is perfect if you are looking for a small, inexpensive knife for light bushcraft tasks. For more heavy-duty tasks, we’d suggest a different knife from our list.

PROS

CONS

How to Choose a Knife for Bushcraft

If you still aren’t sure which knife is perfect for you, we’ll discuss some additional considerations to take into account to help narrow down your search. Specifically, let’s take a look at your blade material, the blade design, the handle, and sheath. 

Material 

Nowadays there are a variety of types of blade steels being used in knife production. There is high carbon steel, stainless steel, cro-van steel, coated steel, and pressed steel. With all of these options, it’s hard to know which one to choose. 

In general, high carbon steels do not dull as quickly as other types of steel and are softer, so they are easier to sharpen. However, they are more prone to rust and corrosion.  

Stainless steels are more durable, corrosion-resistant, and lower maintenance than high carbon steel, but they are also more difficult to sharpen.

Ultimately most knife blades – no matter which type of steel you choose – will last as long as you take care of them. Proper cleaning and oiling do more for a knife blade than most added components or coatings will ever do. Love your knife and your knife will love you.

Blade Design

Apart from the material, the overall blade design is absolutely crucial! Specifically, the blade tang, shape, and grind are the most important considerations in this department. 

The blade tang refers to the back portion of the blade that tapers and extends into the handle. In full tang blades, this back portion extends through the full length of the handle whereas it only extends partway through the handle in a partial tang blade. In general, full tang blades tend to be stronger and provide a tad more leverage. 

For bushcraft use, a flat-blade shape tends to be the most versatile for hunting, woodwork, and cooking. Additionally, a serrated portion is useful for wood cutting but is not required by any means. 

For the grind, we tend to see chisel, scandi, and hollow options most often. The strengths of each of these options are outlined below. 

  • Hollow: Very thin razor edge which is very easy to sharpen and useful for skinning and dressing.
  • Chisel: Excellent for versatile use, and can also be used for heavy-duty cutting.
  • Scandi: This name is short for ‘Scandinavian grind’. It’s a short and flat grind imparted on a reasonably thin blade.

Handle

While the blade attracts most of the attention for the best bushcraft knives, the handle is no less important! The handle is what gives you control over the knife with a firm grip and potentially protects your fingers from any mishap. 

The standard materials found in knife handles are wood, plastic, rubber, and glass-filled nylon. Wood is the traditional standard – with a very pleasing aesthetic – but keep in mind that wood handles tend to absorb moisture quickly if not cared for. 

Plastic and rubber handles tend to be very comfortable, provide a firm grip, and are reasonably durable. Glass-filled nylon tends to be the most expensive option, but it’s certainly incredibly tough and will last the longest! 

So consider what’s important to you and which material looks best to figure out which handle design to opt for. In closing, also consider a blade guard that will protect your fingers while using the knife. 

Sheath

This is the protective cover that secures the blade when you’re not using your knife. The most common materials are plastic, leather, and nylon. Of these three, nylon tends to be my least favorite as it tends to wear down over time. 

Leather is an excellent option, albeit a little more expensive. If you opt for leather, try to find a sheath with minimal seams as a solid piece is much more durable in the long run. Finally, plastic tends to be the most heavy-duty and minimalistic option on our list; what’s more, it’s very easy to clean if it ever gets grimy. 

The last thing to potentially look for in a sheath is a belt attachment or other method for securing the knife. This would allow you to have the knife easily accessible – without it bouncing around in your pocket. 

Final Thoughts

Overall, whether you choose our editor’s choice of the Gerber StrongArm Serrated Fixed Blade, our budget option of the Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade, splurge and buy the KA-BAR Becker Kephart, or go with any other knife on our list, we guarantee you will be happy with your purchase.  

Not sure if a bush knife in the $100 price range is right for you? If you’re looking for a bushcraft knife on even less of a budget, try our article on the best bushcraft knives under $50.  

Ultimately, there are some great, low-cost options on the market, and as long as you take care of them properly, we know you’ll find a fantastic bushcraft knife to add to or start your collection.

Related Reading:

Found This Useful? Give it a Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on reddit
Reddit
Share on pinterest
Pinterest

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *